Paideia 2017 – Meditation Classes & Sessions

Next week, Jan 16-19, brings some special meditation opportunities as part of Reed’s informal winter session: Paideia 2017. Here’s the full list (with class descriptions at the bottom):

  • Jan 16, M, noon-1 pm, Eliot chapel – Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners taught by Mary Priester ’76 and Prof. Alan Shusterman
  • CANCELLED (College closed because of weather) – Jan 17, Tu, noon-1 pm, Eliot chapel – sitting meditation, first bells at 12:10, last bells at 12:40, drop-ins welcome-come when you can-leave when you want
  • Jan 17, Tu, 2-3 pm, Dance Studio – Walking Meditation taught by Alan Shusterman
  • Jan 18, W, noon-1 pm, Eliot chapel – Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners taught by Mary Priester ’76 and Prof. Alan Shusterman
  • Jan 19, Th, 2-3 pm, Dance Studio – Walking Meditation taught by Alan Shusterman

All of the events listed above are also listed on the Reed Meditation Google calendar, and are open to all members of the Reed community and their guests.

While it isn’t necessary to sign up for the classes, doing so could be a good way to show Paideia organizers your support for meditation. Tuesday noon-1 sitting meditation repeats weekly throughout the spring semester. See Our Schedule for dates and locations.

New to meditation? Here are descriptions of the two meditation classes:

Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners

Silent meditation practice offers us an opportunity to step back from the pressing activities of daily life and just observe. Sitting still we can be aware of thoughts, sensations, and emotions, without having to act on them, judge their merits, seek their origins, or pursue them to logical conclusions. Awareness of thoughts as ‘just thoughts’, sensations as ‘just sensations’, and so on, can bring us into a new relationship with our experience of life. Also see Paideia 2014 – Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners

Walking Meditation

Walking meditation is an awareness practice that complements seated meditation. It provides many of the same experiences as traditional seated meditation, but it connects us to a different aspect of experience: being on the move. Even so, ‘just walking’ allows us to be aware of thoughts, sensations, and emotions, without having to act on them, judge their merits, seek their origins, or pursue them to logical conclusions. Awareness of walking as ‘just walking’, thoughts as ‘just thoughts’, sensations as ‘just sensations’, and so on, can bring us into a new relationship with our experience of life. Also see From Here to There – Suggestions for Walking Meditation

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