Plague-free Classics

In anticipation of flu season, the Classics Department welcomed a representative of Asklepios to our Tiber Island/hallway.

Haley and Asklepios representative.

Haley and Asklepios representative.

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Is it a forgery?

I pulled off my shelf an old student edition of Cicero’s Letters to find some sight-reading for Latin 210, and I discovered that my book has a pretty cool provenance:

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There are lots of penciled notes–whether these are of Scullard or the prior owner I cannot yet say. I also have no memory of how this book came into my possession.

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Scenes from ETC 2

It’s pretty neat to come to work and see this:

One of the students has made jam for the faculty.

One of the students has made jam for the faculty.

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Our faculty lounge offers farm-fresh peppers, a poppy seed loaf, and poultry magazines.

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Every Wednesday morning, eggs appear in the refrigerator.

Just another day on ETC 2!

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Updates on Syria’s Cultural Heritage and ISIS

The destruction of Syria’s cultural heritage by ISIS (i.e. ISIL, i.e. the so-called “Islamic State”) has been in the news recently due to the group’s actions in Palmyra, but it has targeted numerous other sites as well. For those interested in keeping up with the current situation in Syria, the blog of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) has been keeping a list of recent links to news regarding ISIS’s actions with respect to cultural heritage. It makes for depressing (but important) reading.

 

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Professor Landvatter goes to Cyprus

 

Petra tou Romiou

Petra tou Romiou / Aphrodite’s Birthplace, Cyprus

Before driving across the country to join the Classics Department, I spent five weeks this summer on Cyprus as a fellow at the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI) to conduct research on the relationships between Cypriot and Egyptian burial practices during the Hellenistic  Period (323 – 30 BCE). Cyprus was the major overseas territory of the Ptolemaic Empire and had always been a crossroads of the cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean. Though many (but not all) ancient Cypriots were Greek speakers, the material culture of the island exhibits influence from Anatolia, Egypt, and the Levant, as well as from the Greek cities of the Aegean. Continue reading

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Professor Sabnis in Algeria

Here’s some stuff in French about the highlight of my summer, a conference on Apuleius in Souk Ahras (Thagaste), Algeria. You can see me speaking next to some flags.

And here is a picture of a donkey in Apuleius’ hometown Madauros (M’daourouch, Algeria):

This is a donkey in Madauros. Oh my god.

This is a donkey in Madauros. Oh my god.

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Article in Eidolon by Professor Seidman

And this article by Professor Seidman, of which some Reed Classics folks heard the beginnings, has appeared recently in Eidolon.

 

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Article on Lucian by Cecilia D’Anastasio ’13

This blog has been lying low this summer, but that is about to change! Lots of faculty news to come soon, but for now I’m super proud to link to an article by Cecilia D’Anastasio ’13 about Lucian’s True History as the first science fiction. Ben Stevens ’99 is quoted in the article as well. Yay! (I’m teaching this text for Greek 210 in fall, as it happens!)

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-earliest-science-fiction

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Get on it, guys. These NZ kids are putting you to shame.

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Classics juniors present at NUCAW

[Guest post: Haley Tilt ’16]

Bailey Boatsman and I, Haley Tilt, represented Reed on April 25 at NUCAW, the undergraduate conference hosted by Willamette University in Salem. Bailey gave a talk on a painting she made, detailing the way Augustus manipulated pre-established beliefs and myths about augury in order to bolster his own divinely-wrought legitimacy. The painting was a hit, and it quickly gathered a small crowd of admirers during the breaks. I presented a talk on Lucretian puns, arguing that Lucretius uses wordplay in order to temper his potentially alienating Epicureanism. The talk went smoothly (minus a little hiccup in the handout process), and I got some really interesting questions at the end, some of which I hope to be ready to answer if I ever give the talk again (I will be adding Varro to my reading list, for one).

 

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