Echoes of Harlem

There’s a time travel portal next to the reference desk.

1920s and 1930s Harlem NYC was a time when African American arts and culture flourished. Jazz music from Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong could be heard floating from Harlem nightclubs. Painters such as Jacob Lawrence and Archibald Motley chronicled the daily lives of African Americans.

It was also a politically and racially charged time in US history. If you walked down 5th Avenue you might see a black flag hanging from the NAACP office that proclaimed “A MAN WAS LYNCHED YESTERDAY” in bold white lettering.

Whether you’re interested in Harlem Renaissance aesthetic, culture, or politics, our book display has something for you. Come discover a good read and learn about the Echoes of Harlem that still reverberate throughout NYC and the USA today.

All items available for checkout!

Hidden Histories of Race & Reed

New exhibit! “Hidden Histories of Race & Reed”, developed and curated by Ashley San Miguel and Maya Arigala, opened in the second floor Eliot Hall display cases Friday December 13th.

Flyer for exhibit. Black and white photograph of Reed students protesting outside of Eliot Hall with signs. Flyer text reads: "Exhibit unveiling: hidden histories of race & Reed. Join us at the second floor Eliot display cases! December 13th Drop in between 5pm-7pm. Reception in Eliot 216, food will be provided. Vegan & GF options. Sponsored by: social justice fund, library archives, office for institutional diversity. Email ashsanmic@reed.edu or arigalam@reed.edu with questions."

This exhibit uses items from the Reed College Archives to chart the 1968 Black Student Union (BSU) protests to install a Black Studies Center at Reed, and the subsequent rise and dissolution of the center just a few years later.

Black and white photograph of Reed students protesting outside of Eliot Hall with signs. The photograph is the same as used in the event flyer.
Black Studies Demonstration, Eliot Hall 1968. Photograph by Stephen S. Robinson, class of 1972.

Selections from a Gift of Richard Danzig ’65

 

A display of materials from a donation by  Dr. Richard Danzig ’65  are now on view. These publications relate to nineteenth and twentieth century India and contain demographic information, offer insights into constitutional reform and recount the deeds of Indian intellectuals that shaped India’s past, present, and future.

This display is located on the rear side of the Reference Desk bookshelf and will be on view until May 21, 2019.

For more information or comments please contact sbavier@reed.edu.

Reed Student Publications


April 6 – June 1, 2018
Flat cases and wall case by the Reference Desk

In many ways, the types of publications Reed students choose to produce are indicative of much larger social trends at the college and beyond. The newest exhibit from the Archives and Special Collections, “Student Publications at Reed” takes a look at the ways students have used pamphlets, comic books, journals, fliers and more as a media by which to process their world. Take a look through a few, and you might just get a glimpse of Reed of yesteryear…

An Identity Crises: Images of Dissent at Reed, 1966-1972

Like any institution, Reed College has always been shaped by the individuals who care about it most. Founded out of Progressive Era ideals, Reed’s early years were fueled by a desire to reject the status quo of other institutions. This Reedie way of life, however, was not always interpreted in the same way. In the 1960s Reed was beginning to undergo an ideological schism between the Old Guard, Reed’s established faculty and administrators, and the Young Turks, the younger, often un-tenured faculty. This exhibit and corresponding website uses items from the college archives to give an overview of Reed’s identity crisis and the global issues which pitted the young thinkers against the status quo.

The exhibit runs from December 8th 2017- February 1st, 2018. Curated by Emily Jane Clark, Social Justice Exhibits and Research Intern.

See the online exhibit here (http://blogs.reed.edu/an-identity-crisis/)

Great Ideas: The Inventivity of Books

April 4 – June 23, 2017
Flat cases and wall case by the Reference Desk

Surprisingly, the book format has long experienced creative developments. Though outliers to the normal codex format, the items shown in this exhibit confirm that bookmakers are ingenious in their invention. From the physical—like The Invisible Book made out of clear tape–to the shaped, such as Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror, and from the food box of Eat and Die to the Viewmaster of Mushrooms in Their Natural Habitats, there will be something to impress and surprise the viewer.

Illustrated Books: Interior Pictures – Exterior Views

winsor-mccay-nemo4
December 1, 2016 to February 22, 2017
Flat and wall cases in the library

A selection of illustrated volumes from the library’s special collections is on display ranging from the early Book of Kells through contemporary artists’ books and from hand-colored pochoir to comics. Come see the beauty of book illustrations and enjoy their many forms from the Reed collections.

Realia: Objects from the Archives

winsor-mccay-nemo4
August 4 – mid-November 2016.
Flat and Wall Cases

The new exhibit in the library’s flat and wall cases is “Realia: Objects from the Archives”. The Reed College Special Collections contain many objects from the history of the college, its founders, and its activities. These are documented and stored in the library’s many rooms devoted to special collections and archives. They range from the wooden palanquin on which the flaming boar’s head was carried in earlier years to Simeon Reed’s fishing pole. A selection of these items allows us to see a real piece of Reed and to help us imagine the life of the mind in previous decades.

Guerrilla Girls

GuerrillaGirls

April 11- May 3, 2016
Flat and Wall Cases

The Guerrilla Girls are a small group of women outraged at the inequality in the art world over how few women are shown, reviewed, selected as playwrights, or accepted but also in the larger world of women’s rights, status, and politics.  The library owns a large collection of their posters from 1985 to the present; these and many others are on display around the campus, with copies mounted all over in guerrilla fashion.

The Book of Kells: Insular Script & Celtic Decoration

unnamed

March 10 – May 31, 2016
Flat and Wall Cases

The new exhibit focuses on the Book of Kells and its Insular Script, a half-uncial form of handwriting, and Celtic ornamentation. The library’s excellent facsimile of the Book of Kells (1990) is on display along with other research on the manuscript, a note about Celtic decoration, and the connection between Reed and the study of this early hand. The exhibit accompanies the Book of Kells events planned for April 2, 2016, of discussions, demonstrations, and lectures on the Book of Kells and the monastic Irish culture that produced it.