Echoes of Harlem

There’s a time travel portal next to the reference desk.

1920s and 1930s Harlem NYC was a time when African American arts and culture flourished. Jazz music from Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong could be heard floating from Harlem nightclubs. Painters such as Jacob Lawrence and Archibald Motley chronicled the daily lives of African Americans.

It was also a politically and racially charged time in US history. If you walked down 5th Avenue you might see a black flag hanging from the NAACP office that proclaimed “A MAN WAS LYNCHED YESTERDAY” in bold white lettering.

Whether you’re interested in Harlem Renaissance aesthetic, culture, or politics, our book display has something for you. Come discover a good read and learn about the Echoes of Harlem that still reverberate throughout NYC and the USA today.

All items available for checkout!

Save the date: Algorithms of Oppression

Join us for Black Celebration Month: Algorithms of Oppression

Thursday February 20, 2020 at 6:30pm Vollum Lecture Hall

Safiya Umoja Noble is an associate professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in the departments of information studies and African American studies. She is also co-director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry. Safiya is the author of a best-selling book on algorithmic discrimination by internet platforms, Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. 

Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble

She is the recipient of a Hellman Fellowship and the UCLA Early Career Award. She is regularly quoted for her expertise about technology bias in society in news outlets including The Guardian, the BBC, CNN International, USA Today, Wired, Time, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, The New York Times, NPR’s Marketplace, CBS Radio, and is the co-editor of The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Culture and Class Online and Emotions, Technology & Design. She holds a PhD and MS from the Information School at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a BA in sociology from California State University, Fresno.

Noble’s talk will be followed by a reception in the Library.

Co-sponsored by the library, the Office of Institutional Diversity, the Dean of the Faculty, the department of computer science, and the office of Computing and Information Services. Free and open to the public.

Hidden Histories of Race & Reed

New exhibit! “Hidden Histories of Race & Reed”, developed and curated by Ashley San Miguel and Maya Arigala, opened in the second floor Eliot Hall display cases Friday December 13th.

Flyer for exhibit. Black and white photograph of Reed students protesting outside of Eliot Hall with signs. Flyer text reads: "Exhibit unveiling: hidden histories of race & Reed. Join us at the second floor Eliot display cases! December 13th Drop in between 5pm-7pm. Reception in Eliot 216, food will be provided. Vegan & GF options. Sponsored by: social justice fund, library archives, office for institutional diversity. Email ashsanmic@reed.edu or arigalam@reed.edu with questions."

This exhibit uses items from the Reed College Archives to chart the 1968 Black Student Union (BSU) protests to install a Black Studies Center at Reed, and the subsequent rise and dissolution of the center just a few years later.

Black and white photograph of Reed students protesting outside of Eliot Hall with signs. The photograph is the same as used in the event flyer.
Black Studies Demonstration, Eliot Hall 1968. Photograph by Stephen S. Robinson, class of 1972.

Search everything! (in Reed Digital Collections)

We’re excited to share a new feature in Reed Digital Collections: the ability to search across collections! Want to see all items relating to the traditional game of tug of war between Reed first years and sophomores? You’ll now be able to easily search both the digitized photos from archives and the Quest newspaper collection! Or maybe you need images of a frog for an art project? You can now find them in the Art & Architecture collection, the Canyon Collection, and more, all in one search.

Be sure to sign in for full results, and happy searching! Let us know what you think at rdc@groups.reed.edu

Reed College Canyon: new digital collection now available!

We are excited to announce a new RDC resource: the Reed College Canyon collection!

The images in this collection were largely created by Canyon Restoration Manager Zac Perry to document the Canyon from about 1999 to the present. The Reed Canyon was declared a wildlife refuge by the state of Oregon in 1913, and restoration efforts began in 1999. “Restoration goals include improving diversity of wildlife, managing invasive plant species, restoring native plant communities, and increase potential habitat for salmon and other resident fish.” (https://www.reed.edu/canyon/visit.html)

Also included in this collection are photographs of Canyon Day, images created by Canyon student employees and visitors, as well as pre-1999 photographs from the Reed College Archives.

This collection is open to current Reed students, faculty, and staff.

Questions? Contact Laura Buchholz or Zac Perry.

Portland Muslim History Project archives collection now available in RDC!

We’re excited to announce our most recent addition to Reed Digital Collections: selections from the Portland Muslim History Project archive, recently donated to Special Collections and Archives by Reed College professor Dr. Kambiz GhaneaBassiri.

View the Portland Muslim History Project archive in Reed Digital Collections

The 2004 Portland Muslim History Project narrated the history of Muslim built communities in Portland, Oregon. Its aim was to contribute to scholarship on Islam and American religions by exploring how Islam becomes rooted in a local American context.

Archiving the records of this project, as well as the digital collection, is a part of a larger effort led by Dr. GhaneaBassiri, local historian Johanna Ogden, and Multnomah County archivist Terry Baxter to archive the history of Muslims in Oregon. The Oregon Historical Society, Portland State University, and Oregon State University have all played roles in this larger project.

A finding aid for the entire archive donated to Special Collections and Archives will be available in the near future. The digital collection is open to the public.

The Portland Muslim History Project digital collection is the product of a collaboration between Dr. GhaneaBassiri and Special Collections and Archives. Reed College religion majors Tehniyat Naveed and Delainey Myers were indispensable in making this project a reality.

Questions about this collection, or about Reed Digital Collections? Please write to rdc@lists.reed.edu.

Reed Student Publications


April 6 – June 1, 2018
Flat cases and wall case by the Reference Desk

In many ways, the types of publications Reed students choose to produce are indicative of much larger social trends at the college and beyond. The newest exhibit from the Archives and Special Collections, “Student Publications at Reed” takes a look at the ways students have used pamphlets, comic books, journals, fliers and more as a media by which to process their world. Take a look through a few, and you might just get a glimpse of Reed of yesteryear…

Quest newspaper digital collection now available

We’re excited to announce our most recent addition to Reed Digital Collections: digitized issues of The Quest newspaper, beginning with the first issue in 1913. The collection is open to current Reed students, faculty, and staff.

Check out a sampler of Quest mastheads below to get you started!

 

An Identity Crises: Images of Dissent at Reed, 1966-1972

Like any institution, Reed College has always been shaped by the individuals who care about it most. Founded out of Progressive Era ideals, Reed’s early years were fueled by a desire to reject the status quo of other institutions. This Reedie way of life, however, was not always interpreted in the same way. In the 1960s Reed was beginning to undergo an ideological schism between the Old Guard, Reed’s established faculty and administrators, and the Young Turks, the younger, often un-tenured faculty. This exhibit and corresponding website uses items from the college archives to give an overview of Reed’s identity crisis and the global issues which pitted the young thinkers against the status quo.

The exhibit runs from December 8th 2017- February 1st, 2018. Curated by Emily Jane Clark, Social Justice Exhibits and Research Intern.

See the online exhibit here (http://blogs.reed.edu/an-identity-crisis/)

Small Gems: Small Books from Reed’s Collection

August 2 – November 1, 2017
Library flat cases

Often good things come in small packages, and the many small books in the library’s special collections testify to the great variety and beauty possible in tiny books. From a facsimile of a 1320’s Book of Hours (at 10cm high) to a foldout artist’s book showing the audio waveforms of ‘noisy words’ (at 43mm tall), these books both inform and entertain.