#20: Sexual Politics in Argentina with Dashiell Allen ’21, Spanish

Dashiell’s thesis exploration of sexual politics in Argentina in the 70s and 80s begins by examining a publication called Somos, an underground magazine published by what was likely the first lgbt political organization in Latin America. Dashiell also talks about what it was like to graduate Reed as a “spring/fall senior” (students who graduate in the fall instead of in the spring as most Reed students do).

Reed community members can read Dashiell’s thesis, “From Somos to Prosa plebeya: A Discussion of Sexual Politics in Argentina,” online in the Electronic Theses Archive.

#19: Deducing the Indeducible with Rowen Bangs ’20, Philosophy/Math

Frank interviews Rowen about a thesis year like no other. Rowen’s thesis experience explored some arguments about the epistemology of mathematics, or, as Rowen puts it, it was “a philosophical argument that used elements of mathematics.” Rowen touches on Gödel’s Theorem, Peano Arithmetic, and related theories.

Reed community members can read Rowen’s thesis online in the Electronic Theses Archive, which includes a short preface on the usefulness of epistemic thought in times of great crisis.

Summer 2021 Announcement

Burn Your Draft is taking a break for the summer and will be back in fall 2021 with our new student producer and host, Amelie Andreas ’24. We’ll have a bunch of interviews with ’21 grads to share, as well as a couple more from the class of 2020. We want to give huge thanks to our outgoing producer, Frank Tangherlini ’22. We could not have done any of this without you Frank!

#18: Tiny Machines with Kate Stoll ’04, Biochem and Molecular Biology

Kate Stoll ’04 reflects on her thesis work on ScaR proteins with Arthur Glasfeld, Margret Geselbracht Professor of Chemistry, and her fascination with proteins, the “tiny machines that do all the work in your body.” This was Frank’s first interview for the podcast and took place in-person in January 2020. Kate’s thesis title: “The DNA and metal ion specificity of ScaR, the Streptococcal cell adhesion protein regulator of ‘S. gordonii.'”

#17: The Dizzying Math behind Spin Chains with Nate MacFadden ’19, Math/Physics

Join Seth Paskin ’90 as he interviews interdisciplinary Math/Physics graduate Nate MacFadden in Fall 2019 on his research into just how predictable quantum phenomena like spin chains really are. Don’t worry if that’s already got your head spinning, because this episode’s packed with a lot more than just math: from the hard and soft skills of thesising, to why your high school job might matter more than you think.